Tree of the sun

Tree of the sun

Fighting for your soul

Fighting for your soul

Mille Anni Passe Sunt

Mille Anni Passe Sunt

The National Museum of Romanian History (Romanian: Muzeul Naţional de Istorie a României) is a museum on Calea Victoriei in Bucharest, Romania, which contains Romanian historical artifacts from prehistoric times up to modern times.

The permanent displays include a plaster cast of the entirety of Trajan's Column, the Romanian Crown Jewels, and the Pietroasele treasure.

The museum is located inside the former Postal Services Palace, which also houses a philatelic museum. As of 2007, the museum is under reconstruction; a late medieval archaelogical site was discovered under the building.

Bucharest Dream

Bucharest Dream

For centuries, Dâmboviţa River was the main source of drinking water for the city of Bucharest. While there were a few dozen water wells, most of the water in Bucharest was distributed by water-carriers.
Bucharest folkore mentions the waters of Dâmboviţa as "sweet", and even at the beginning of the 18th century, Anton Maria del Chiaro considered it "light and clean". However, toward the end of the century, as the population of Bucharest increased, the river ceased to be as clean, and hence the need of the aqueducts. The earliest aqueducts with public fountains (cişmele) were built during the rule of Prince Alexander Ypsilantis.
The Dâmboviţa often flooded Bucharest, especially the lower left bank, which was lower. After the great 1775 flood, Ypsilantis ordered a branch canal to be built, in order to prevent, or at least diminish the effects of such flooding; in 1813, Prince Jean Georges Caradja decided to clean up the river bed.
Dâmboviţa is one of the most polluted rivers in Romania and the most important source of pollution of Danube, in which its waters flow. When entering Bucharest, the river's water quality is already rather bad and below the recommended standards, but after exiting Bucharest, its water are in the worst category, due to the hundreds of millions of cubic metres of raw sewage which are dumped every year directly in the river.
The river contains very high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus, and as such, it has just forms of life found typically in toxic environments: larvae, insects and microorganisms.

The quality of the waters is expected to improve after first sewage treatment plant of Bucharest will start working toward the end of 2009 (with a capacity of 10 m³/sec), while a second one should be ready by 2012.

Winterfingers

Winterfingers

In the eye of sniper

In the eye of sniper

None was harmed in that "shoot"

From history

From history

Bărăţia is one of the Roman Catholic churches in Bucharest, Romania. It is located in central Bucharest, on the I. C. Brătianu Blvd, next to Piaţa Unirii.Its name, used in antiquated Romanian for several Catholic churches, is derived from a Hungarian word of Slavic origin, barát, meaning "brother" or "monk".
The history of the church can be traced back to 1314, when Franciscan monks built a wooden church near the early settlements at the location of present-day Bucharest, mainly for Italian merchants traveling to the Byzantine Empire.

Bucharest was atested in 1459, and the wooden church rebuilt several times. In 1629-1633, a new stone church was constructed by Franciscan monks from the Province of Bulgaria. In 1716, the Wallachian Prince Ştefan Cantacuzino promised that he would repair it, but he had to abdicate that same year. Leopold I donated 1,500 golden ducats for the repairs, to which Prince Nicholas Mavrocordatos contributed a further 280 ducats, and the work was finished in 1741.

The church burnt down during the 1847 Bucharest fire and its reconstruction, which ended in 1848, was financed by the Imperial House of Vienna, which donated 4,000 guilders. The big bell was cast in 1855, being financed by Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria.

During the Communist era, many buildings of the parish were demolished or confiscated by the State. The church underwent a major renovation in 1954.

Church in graph

Church in graph

Kretzulescu Church (Romanian: Biserica Kretzulescu or Creţulescu) is an Eastern Orthodox church in central Bucharest, Romania. Built in the Brâncovenesc style, it is located on Calea Victoriei, nr. 45A, at one of the corners of Revolution Square, next to the former Royal Palace.

The church was commissioned in 1720–1722 by the boyar Iordache Creţulescu and his wife Safta, a daughter of prince Constantin Brâncoveanu. Originally, the exterior was painted, but since the restoration work done in 1935–1936 (under the supervision of architect Ştefan Balş), the facade is made of brick. The frescoes on the porch date from the original structure, while the interior frescoes were painted by Gheorghe Tattarescu in 1859–1860.

The church, damaged during the November, 1940 earthquake, was repaired in 1942–1943. In the early days of the communist regime, Kretzulescu Church was slated for demolition, but was saved due to efforts of architects such as Henriette Delavrancea-Gibory. More renovations took place after the Bucharest earthquake of 1977 and the Revolution of 1989. To the side of the church now stands a memorial bust of Corneliu Coposu.

Fast sound of nightlife

Fast sound of nightlife
Can you hear it?